The Sun is Also a Star is a story about immigrants (first generation, second generation, and undocumented), families, dreams, and falling in love. Natasha is mere hours away from being deported to Jamaica, but instead of spending the day helping her family pack she goes off in a last ditch effort to try and get a stay on the deportation order. Daniel is off to an interview with a Yale alumni, the first step towards fulfilling his Korean parents dream for him of become a doctor. On the way to their respective meetings in Manhattan Natasha and Daniel collide and despite Natasha’s better sense and protests, Daniel (a poet at heart) convinces her to spend the day with him. Against the backdrop of impending deportation and making a future based on one’s own dreams or living up to a families expectations, Natasha and Daniel find themselves falling in love.

Yoon has crafted a whirlwind, bittersweet tale that manages to show that every story can have an infinite number of sides and that the end of the story isn’t necessarily the end. Personally, I liked it quite a bit more than her other novel, Everything, Everything, although I may be in the minority with my opinion on that particular book as the movie recently came out.